Where They Live – Two Sisters

The Varonas are two sisters that live in two houses in a small village far outside the city of Holguin, Cuba.

L. and son Cristian.

Corrugated steel panels for roofing is typical.

The door in the distance is the outhouse and has no running water.

Cousins

 

M. lives on the same dirt road a few houses away.

The sisters wash clothes together because there is only one washing machine.

The white rectangular unit next to the red barrel is an old Soviet washing machine. It is increasingly difficult to find repair parts and new Chinese models cost over 250 cuc.

Decorations.

Proud people, the women keep their houses neat and clean.

Baskets and Hats – Trinidad

On the distant outskirts of Trinidad, Cuba, my fellow travelers and I discovered a group of eight women making baskets.  One woman, obviously the boss, invited us into the old cattle barn and allowed us to photograph.

This woman was stripping the stalks in half lengthwise.

Bundles of material ready to weave.

Working near a window for the light.

Nimble fingers

This woman never looked up from her work. Not knowing who we were, I think she was a bit afraid to stop.

 

Boiler Repair

After a couple of hours wondering I found myself near the oil-fired power plant in Havana. As in the U.S., many of these old plants have beautiful architecture so I got as close as I could.

Title on the sign: “Advice from the commander-in-chief”

As I rounded the corner I realized there was some repair work in progress.

Workers were replacing  tubular air pre-heater modules and the old sections were being cut up on the ground.

New modules and duct-work were placed where the crane could pick them up.

I wanted to get a few images of the workers hanging on the side of the boiler house, but numerous security guards waved me away.

Where They Live – Two Brothers

While exploring a dirt road on the distant outskirts of Trinidad, Cuba my fellow travelers and I were waved into the homestead of Antonio and Jose Manuel Verde. These two brothers wanted to share their hospitality and show us around their farm.

 

Antonio did most of the talking, explaining when the mangoes would be ready to pick and guiding us through all the different crops that they harvest.

Cooking with charcoal.

Jose Manuel made us some of their home-grown coffee.

 

 

 

Singer

Cars aren’t the only American product that have survived the 60 years since the revolution.

These heavy, old, American-made, sewing machines just keep on working. They can be found quite often in Cuba.

This woman in Cojimar takes in sewing jobs to earn a few pesos. She was kind enough to let me photograph.

 

People with sewing machines in their homes can find work to do.

 

Singers are still used in businesses.

 

The Presidential Limo

I wonder how many Americans have ever been this close to the Presidential limo. I don’t think one can get this close in the United States.

These photos were taken in 2016 during the U.S. President’s visit to Havana. I happened to be staying across the street.

Wide angle shot from just outside the doorway to my casa. The woman on the right is U.S. secret service.

I assume the man with the extra long backpack was also secret service. I was amazed at how relaxed all the U.S. personnel were, in comparison to the Cuban security force.

Cars filled the street ( San Rafael ) for as far as I could see and they all kept their engines running.

After jumping back and forth from one side of the street to the other, this woman said “You, SIR, are to get in one doorway and stay there”.¬† I went back to my balcony.

Check this post for the worst kept secret in Havana :

https://wp.me/p4fUlX-oM

 

 

Cuba 2014